Toastmaster

RESPONSIBILITIES:

To present a two-minute toast during the formal portion of the meeting. The toast should be appropriate to the theme of the meeting and set the mood for the formal section of the meeting.

To introduce the speakers and speech evaluators.

PRIOR TO THE MEETING:

BEGIN YOUR PLANNING ONE WEEK PRIOR TO THE MEETING.

Call each of the speakers before the meeting (not the night before) to remind them that they are speaking.

Interview the speakers to determine the speech title, the manual project number, the speech objective, time requirements, and then something interesting about themselves that you can use to introduce them (i.e. hobbies, job, family, why this topic, why this time, etc.). Refer to the Communications and Leadership manual regarding the objectives of a manual speech.

Prepare introductions for each speaker. A proper introduction is important to the success of the speaker’s presentation. Your duty is to make the audience want to hear the speaker and put the speaker at ease. To do this you must establish the credibility of the speaker by informing the audience of the speaker’s expertise, interest or talent in that particular subject. Weave the speaker’s manual objectives into your introduction so that the audience will know what they should expect from the presentation. Practice your introductions as you would a prepared speech.

Call the Speech Evaluators, and ensure that they have spoken with the speakers and are aware of the speech objectives and the speaker’s goals. If an Evaluator is unable to be at the meeting, the evaluator MUST find his/her own replacement. You should ensure that every speaker has an evaluator (preferably a more experienced member).

Check with the Chairperson if there is a theme for the meeting. If there is, prepare your toast around the theme. Your toast should be meaningful and inspirational, not frivolous. It can refer to a person, place, season or a thing. It is 2 minutes long. Establish the premise for the toast by perhaps explaining the importance of the subject matter to you, give some pertinent information about it, then invite people to stand and share in the salutation. The toast itself, which will be repeated by the members, should be no longer than three words (i.e. “To Happy Days”)

Toast a person, but Drink to a place, thing, object.

AT THE MEETING:

After the Chairperson introduces you, briefly explain the purpose of the Toastmaster.

Present the toast.

Give your opening remarks regarding the expected prepared presentation to be given by the speakers. Remember to preside with enthusiasm, sincerity, and decisiveness.

Remind the audience to complete the speech evaluation forms for each speaker (this is VERY important).

Ask the Timer to explain the timing procedure for the speeches.

When an introduction is completed, start the applause immediately, and MAINTAIN it until the speaker reaches the lectern.

After each speech, provide a bridge for your audience, so you can move enthusiastically from one speaker to the other. Thank the speaker, and make a brief comment to lead from one speaker to the next.

Allow a one-minute interval between speakers for the audience to complete their evaluations.

When the speeches have concluded, ask the Timer for speech times.

Ask the members and guests to write their choice for Best Speaker (if 3 or more speakers participated).

Introduce (much more briefly) the Speech Evaluators.

Ask the members and guests to write their choice for Best Evaluator on their Ballot. The eligible candidates for Best Evaluator include the Table Topics Evaluator and each of the Speech Evaluators.

Direct the Helper to collect the Ballot/Evaluator slips.

Return control of the meeting to the Chairperson.

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